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Date, Time, Currency Rate
Japan:
Thursday, Dec 3, 2020, 3:09 AM
Central USA:
Wednesday, Dec 2, 2020, 12:09 PM
Currency: 1 USD = 104.53 JPY

Japan Days

My Days in Japan

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Welcome to Japan-Days.info

On this web site, I will share with you some stories and pictures from the time when I lived in Japan as a member of the United States Air Force, and from various visits that my wife, Ritsuko, and I have made there since my departure from the military in 1978. I will add content to the site periodically in the "Articles" section, so please visit often. I hope that you enjoy the site.

News Feeds

News feed source: The Japan Times - Culture
Culture – The Japan Times
News on Japan, Business News, Opinion, Sports, Entertainment and More

Netflix plans to double spending on original content in Asia (Culture)
Thu, 03 Dec 2020 02:36:52 +0900

By stepping up its investment, the California-based company is gearing to tackle its main rivals Disney+ and Prime Video, as well as local competitors.
Amabie: Folklore apparition generated a big buzz in 2020 (Culture)
Wed, 02 Dec 2020 02:00:16 +0900

The long-haired, beak-faced amabie, which forecasts bountiful harvests and killer epidemics, has found itself in Japan's spotlight in recent months.
‘Demon Slayer’ now Japan’s second-highest grossing film ever (Culture)
Tue, 01 Dec 2020 01:49:09 +0900

The series also dominated the first through 22nd spots in comic sales rankings in Japan this year, according to industry data.
Dave Prowse, actor who played Darth Vader, dies at 85 (Culture)
Mon, 30 Nov 2020 06:05:24 +0900

Prowse donned Darth Vader's black armor and helmet for "Star Wars” (1977), "The Empire Strikes Back” (1980) and "Return of the Jedi" (1983).
Fighting coronavirus in luxurious style with ¥1 million masks (Culture)
Mon, 30 Nov 2020 02:00:20 +0900

One Japanese firm is selling masks embellished with a 0.7 carat diamond and more than 300 pieces of Swarovski crystal.
50-year-old Doraemon comics become a smash hit during pandemic (Culture)
Sun, 29 Nov 2020 22:27:59 +0900

More than 5 million comic books and other publications featuring the robotic cat were printed in the 12 months to November as children were forced ...
‘Tokyo Before Tokyo’: A guided tour through Tokugawa Ieyasu’s Edo (Culture)
Sun, 29 Nov 2020 04:55:05 +0900

Timon Screech details how Tokyo, formerly known as Edo, developed from a backwater town to the seat of a warlord and, eventually, Japan’s modern capital.
‘There’s No Such Thing as an Easy Job’: How hard is it to find meaning in the modern workplace? (Culture)
Sun, 29 Nov 2020 00:59:53 +0900

In Kikuko Tsumura’s surreal and humorous novel, “There’s No Such Things as an Easy Job,” an unnamed narrator sets her sights on trivial work after ...
‘Anime Architecture’ brings out the beauty in the details (Culture)
Fri, 27 Nov 2020 05:10:19 +0900

Stefan Riekeles’ book puts a spotlight on the background work that informs the ambience of anime's intricate worlds.

Travel to Japan

With Ritsuko having been born and raised in a small town in rural Kagoshima Prefecture, I have had the opportunity to visit the area with her many times over the years.

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stone lined stream that directs water to the Shimazu estate

Southern Kyushu is a beautiful part of Japan that receives sufficient rainfall for the mountains and valleys to be covered in lush vegetation, and has a long history of responsible productive use of the land and resources.

Walking through the countryside, one thing that you will notice are the centuries old stone lined aquaducts that are still in use today. Their presence and use give testament to how well the people of this region have managed, and continue to manage the flow of water from the mountains and into the fields and towns.

During our stay in Kagoshima on our 2016 Japan trip, we visited Sengan-en. Sengan-en is a park established on the grounds of a beautiful estate that has belonged to the Shimazu family for the past three and a half centuries. I will write more about the estate, garden, and museum in another article, however, I just wanted to share this video of a Sakon-Taro in operation. This is a water powered device that was used to remove the husks and to polish rice.

Below, is a video of the machine going through a cycle.

Video of Sakon-taro in operation - Sengan-en, Kagoshima, Japan

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Sakon-taro rice husking device at Sengan-En, Kagoshima, beginning to cycle

Sakon-taro rice husking device at Sengan-En, Kagoshima, about to strike

 | Published by: Japan Days  logo
 | Date Modified: October 24, 2020

Japan Culture

One evening during our 2016 Japan trip, Ritsuko and I were shopping in the Akihabara district of Tokyo, and decided to stop in a restaurant near Akihabara Station for a quick snack before moving on.

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Near Akihabara Station - Draft Beer Vending Machine

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The chilled mug is tipped for pouring, and changes angle as the beer is dispensed.

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Foam is added to form the perfect head.

In that restaurant, we saw the most marvelous of mechanical contraptions -- a draft beer vending machine. Ok, I must admit that I don't get out much, and that I am easily amused and entertained, but I thought this was just a great invention, and oh so practical. For ¥300, this machine, which is even equipped with a chiller in the lower part of the cabinet for glass mugs, pours a perfect mug of beer for the customer.

In the video below, Ritsuko demonstrates how it works:

Video of Ritsuko demonstrating the operation of a draft beer vending machine in a restaurant near Akihabara Station

We were each planning to drink just one glass of beer with our ramen, but watching the machine go through its paces was so entertaining that we each had to buy another round, just so we could watch the it run a couple more cycles.

In Japan, automated conveniences like vending machines are like a cultural and industrial art form, and this draft beer vending machine is truly a work of art.

Draft beer, perfectly poured into a chilled mug -- automation nirvana

 | Published by: Japan Days  logo
 | Date Modified: October 1, 2019

My Air Force Days

me with camera 1977

Me with movie camera - 1977

I was going through some boxes of old pictures and slides, when I came upon a small box full of 8mm movie films. And no, they weren't the "training films" that used to sometimes surface on poker nights at Yokota. These were movies that I shot with my Canon 814 Super 8 movie camera back in the early to mid 1970's.

In that box, one was labeled WB57 taxi. I had not thought about having made that film for many years. Thinking back to the early part of my Yokota tour, I remembered shooting a short clip one winter day, I think it was in Dec 1973, or possibly January 1974, of a WB57F taxiing on the parking ramp toward the runway.

I was standing on the wing of a WC-135, working on a U-1 foil, and luckily, I had taken my movie camera onto the aircraft with me that day. When I noticed that the B57's engines were starting, I ducked inside the aircraft, grabbed my camera, and went back out on the wing to get ready to film. As you can see in the video, standing on the wing of the 135 was the perfect vantage point from which to shoot. Unfortunately, I only had enough film left in the camera to shoot part of the taxi, and didn't have an extra film cassette to film the takeoff. Anyway, I am very happy to have taken the movie that day. I just had the super 8 converted to digital so that I could enjoy watching it in a more convenient format, and so that I could share it via this website.

Notice how low the wing tips are; the airplane must have had a full load of fuel. It looks like the left wing tip almost clips a snow bank as the plane rolls by.

Here are a couple of images that I captured from the video.

This is a WB57F high altitude reconnaissance plane taxiing toward the runway at Yokota Air Base in 1973

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Another view - WB57F Yokota AB

 
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WB57F P-systems and spheres in the Yokota AB MET/ARE shop

The WB57F was a pretty amazing aircraft. It had a wing span that was almost twice the fuselage length, and powered by two TF-33 fan jet engines (sometimes two smaller J-60 engines were mounted outboard of the main engines), it had a ceiling altitude of about 80,000ft. Although it could be equipped with a variety of special equipment, the standard configuration consisted of a B400 detection unit, an I-2 foil and single U-1 foil for particulate air sampling, and a P-system, which consisted of two platforms mounted in the nose. Each P-system platform, several of which are on the floor in the picture on the left, had two compressors, and held four 900 cu in steel spheres that could be pressurized to 3000psi. This equipment was the basic gear used to sample debris from nuclear tests performed, at that time, primarily by our cold war adversaries, USSR and China.

Prior to my tour at Yokota, these aircraft had been assigned to the 56th Weather Reconnaissance Squadron. After the 56th WRS was deactivated, 9th Weather Reconnaissance Wing left an operational detachment there, to which was assigned 3 of these aircraft along with the flight crews and necessary operational staff. Maintenance personnel, including MET/ARE were re-assigned to the 610 MASS.

I don't remember exactly when the 9th Weather Wing detachment was de-activated, and the aircraft left Yokota, but I think that it was very late 1974 or early 1975. That was the end of my experience supporting these unique aircraft.

The last news article that I read about the WB57F was from about 4 years ago in a piece that discussed an operation in Afghanistan run by NASA utilizing the last two remaining operational WB57F's as a platform for a highly specialized communications system. It was good to know that a couple of them were still flying high.

 | Published by: Japan Days  logo
 | Date Modified: October 1, 2019
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